Sedation Dentistry: Can You Really Relax in the Dentist's Chair?

Dr. Soyster - Sedation Dentistry

Sedation Dentistry: Can You Really Relax in the Dentist's Chair?

Does the thought of having your teeth cleaned make your entire body tense with fear? Would you rather endure the agony of a toothache than step foot in a dentist's office? You're not alone. A lot of people are so phobic about going to the dentist that they prefer not to have any treatment.

For people who avoid dentists like the plague, sedation dentistry may take away some of their anxiety. Sedation can be used for everything from invasive procedures to a simple tooth cleaning. How it's used depends on the severity of the fear.

What Is Sedation Dentistry?

Sedation dentistry uses medication to help patients relax during dental procedures. It's sometimes referred to as "sleep dentistry," although that's not entirely accurate. Patients are usually awake with the exception of those who are under general anesthesia.

The levels of sedation used include:

What Types of Sedation Are Used in Dentistry?

The following types of sedation are used in dentistry:

Regardless of which type of sedation you receive, you'll also typically need a local anesthetic -- numbing medication at the site where the dentist is working in the mouth -- to relieve pain if the procedure causes any discomfort.

Contact us with any question you may have, we are ready to assist you schedule a consultation with Dr. Soyster.

(925) 689-1020

 

Author
Ruben Alvarez Ruben Alvarez Alvarez Solutions is a leading provider of dental practice management solutions with personalize coaching techniques. Whether you are just starting with your dental practice and need help to establish your business, or you are an experienced dentist who wants to revive the practice and improve revenue and reputation. Coaching Staff Training, Patient Management, PR Support, Billing and Insurance Support, Doctor and Hygiene Department Development.

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